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Due to the anticipated disruption of access to the Court by its facilities falling inside the security perimeter during the Papal visit, by order of the Court, the Clerk’s Office of United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit will close on Tuesday, September 22, 2015, at 3:30 p.m., ET. The Court will remain closed Wednesday, September 23, 2015, and will reopen on Thursday, September 24, 2015, at 8:30 a.m. For purposes of computing time, and for motions to enlarge time under Fed. R. App. Proc. 26 and Fed. Cir. R. 26, Wednesday, September 23, 2015, will be considered a "legal holiday."

Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 48, six panels of the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments in Boston, Massachusetts, on October 6 through 8, 2015. In accordance with routine practice, the names of the panel judges will not be released prior to the morning of scheduled arguments.

The schedule and location of the panels is as follows:


Panel J: 10 a.m.
John J. Moakley U.S. Courthouse
Panel Courtroom – 7th Floor
1 Courthouse Way
Boston, MA 02210

Panel K: 2:30 p.m.
Boston College School of Law
East Wing 120 (Basement Level)
885 Centre Street
Newton, MA 02459


Panel L: 10 a.m.
Boston Univ. School of Law
Courtroom 602 – 6th Floor
765 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215

Panel M: 10 a.m.
Northeastern Univ. School of Law
Moot Courtroom – 1st Floor (Dockser Hall)
65 Forsythe Street
Boston, MA 02115


Panel N: 10 a.m.
Suffolk Law School
Courtroom 425 (Large Moot Courtroom) – 4th Floor (Sargent Hall)
120 Tremont Street
Boston, MA 02108

Panel O: 2 p.m.
Harvard Law School
Ames Courtroom – 2nd Floor (Austin Hall)
1563 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138

This announcement has been updated to indicate location information for the oral arguments.

Additional information will be available on the Court’s website at the Arguments/Upcoming Arguments tab.

The Honorable Kara F. Stoll took the oath of office in a private ceremony at 2 p.m. on Friday, July 17, 2015, in the chambers of Chief Judge Sharon Prost. Judge Stoll fills the only vacancy on the on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and is the court's twelfth active circuit judge. Judge Stoll was nominated by President Obama on November 12, 2014, and she was confirmed by a 95 to 0 vote of the U.S. Senate on July 7, 2015.

Circuit Judge Stoll’s biography may be read here.

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has amended Federal Circuit Rules of Practice and Procedure 46(c) and 52(a) and (e) to require the mandatory use of pay.gov when attorneys are paying fees to the court. Additions to the rules are noted in blue print; deletions are noted in strikeout print.

Pro se litigants are unaffected by these rule changes.

Pay.gov has been available for optional use since September of 2013. As a result of these rule changes, pay.gov is now mandated for use beginning Monday, July 6, 2015. Attorneys and firms requiring changes in business practices in order to effectively use pay.gov are encouraged to make such changes in order to comply with the revised rules beginning Monday, July 6, 2015. Information on system requirements is available in the CM/ECF Users Guide posted on the court website.

In the event pay.gov becomes inaccessible due to technical or other difficulties, the Clerk’s Office will publish guidance on how to proceed, depending on the circumstances of the system failure. Most commonly, disruptions in service a will be of limited duration and filers would simply use the current menu option in CM/ECF that allows filing of a new matter without paying a fee. The fee would then be paid when pay.gov access is restored. Rule 52(d) allows up to 14 days for the payment of required fees before the Clerk of Court would dismiss a matter for failure to pay a fee. Further information will be included in the CM/ECF Users Guide and on the court website.

In its order of December 30, 2014, granting a petition for rehearing en banc in the matter of SCA Hygiene Products v. First Quality Baby Products (case number 13-1564), the court invited the views of amici curiae. Any amicus briefs may be filed without consent and leave of court. The court’s order is available via PACER.